Community news

Since they moved to Liston some 13 years ago the contributions of Ian McMillan and Quentin Poole  to the musical life of our small group of villages has been immense. Memorable concerts with top class artistes have been organised in Liston Church, choirs have been assembled and trained and Ian’s passion for the works of Gilbert and Sullivan was amply demonstrated in the illustrated and participative series of lectures in Pentlow  in 2016. More that once the glory of Foxearth’s historic Father Willis organ has been amply shown through Ian’s expert hands and feet. Musical feasts indeed!

On Tuesday 8th October the  Society was treated to another facet of Ian’s talents when  he talked to some 50 members and guests about the history of Liston Hall. Arising from a standard of research well above his self-confessed A level in history Ian delivered an account of the ancient manor house from its building in c1185 to its demolition (apart from two wings) after the Second World War. Stated originally as being “seated on an eminence” (high ground) descriptions of the property have constantly stressed the beautiful park with its many fruit trees and roses. Over the centuries numerous notable people were linked to the estate – as owners, renters , visitors – including the Duke of Argyll, Sir Cordell Firebrace, very senior professional figures  and generations of the local Clopton and Campbell-Lambert families. The stately homes  of Long Melford Hall and Kentwell were associated with what seems to have been a closely-knit social group. In 1381 Sir Richard Lyons – an extremely wealthy merchant, property owner in several counties including Essex and Suffolk, MP for Essex, Privy Counsellor and Sheriff of London etc- was so hated by the local land workers (for whom he apparently had no time) that he was marched off to London and beheaded. It is recorded that in this early episode of The Peasants’ Revolt Wat Tyler was responsible for the execution and there is no doubt that this part of East Anglia was a hotbed of unrest. In 1712 the German composer, George Frederick Handel settled in London and it is known that he frequently visited Belchamp Hall where one of the two organs that he left in his Will remains. It is nice to think that the other one may be in Liston Church as there is some evidence linking him to Liston Hall where the then residents may well have been on his list of wealthy patrons.

In the mid 19th century there are newspaper accounts of a Harvest party arranged by Rev John Foster, Rector of Foxearth and Ian read some amusing extracts from a diary kept by one Henriette describing mostly everyday events at that time. Two fires – in 1870 and 1882- caused damage which was repaired. During World War 2 the building was used for German and Italian prisoners of war and afterwards , due to the bad state into which the property had fallen and the very low compensation offered, it was demolished. The two remaining wings are The Old Ballroom (known for a time as Park House) and the Hall (formerly the Gentlemens’ Wing)

This was a most entertaining talk, full of information and delivered clearly and characteristically with the energy of a Bach fugue! Ian and Quentin brought along many photographs, pictures, maps and artefacts – including bits of decorative plasterwork recovered from a pond  -and they were warmly thanked by Clare Mathieson for a splendid evening. It is usual for the Society to offer speakers a fee On this occasion Ian generously asked that the Society make a donation to the Parish Church organ fund for which the Parochial Church Council is very grateful.

Next meeting: Saturday, -please note change of normal day -16th November at 7.30pm in Foxearth Village Hall when President Ashley Cooper and Lord Andrew Phillips will reminisce on the theme “A Sudbury Boy Wunders (sic) aloud after 80 years”  There will be a donation bar and the visitor entrance fee will be £5 to include the first drink.

Ken Nice

Foxearth Local History Society – 14th May

It is quite surprising what can be discovered about an apparently ordinary subject if one puts one’s mind to some careful research and this was demonstrated in David Burnett’s talk to the Foxearth and District Local History Society on Tuesday 14th May. Who would have thought that the Sudbury district of Chilton could have such a wealth of history but the journey through time taken by David revealed evidence dating from Bronze Age settlements and many changes to the present day industrial estate. Excavations in 1997 produced signs of late Bronze age occupation, by post holes and ruts in the clay, and of later Iron age round houses. The discovery of a 7th century coptic bowl near Chilton Hall suggested a Saxon settlement. Nothing has been found to suggest any Roman involvement. An entry in the Domesday Book of 1086 describes a small village of about 11 men and 1 plough and in mediaeval times a number of lords held the manor of Chilton. St Mary’s church in Chilton was built in the 15th century. Among various benefactors the church benefitted in 1430 from the will of Sir Andrew Butler.

A significant influence in Chilton seems to have been the Crane family whose five generations – from 1436 to 1643  – were responsible for the building of Chilton hall  and improvements in the church. Each of the five was named Robert and each left their individual mark on the manor. Among the bequests by various Roberts were those for renovations of the church and the building of the tower, funds for the employment of a priest and for prayers and a daily mass to be said for 99 years and the completion of Chilton Hall in 1550. The last Robert was knighted by James 1st and served as MP for Sudbury for several periods. When he died in 1643 the baronetcy became extinct as he had no sons. The parish registers show that the sons of this dynasty had a very poor survival rate; the cause is not known but was possibly due to some inherited condition.

The village gradually declined and in about 1800 the Hall was badly damaged by a fire with the site being turned mostly to arable farming. By the late 19th century industry began to take over with brick works, lime pits. a corn mill and coconut matting factory; again fire caused rebuilding. The last rector of the church was Rev. John Milner who served from 1898 until 1949 after which the building  was declared redundant. Chilton was important towards the end of World War 2 when an airfield was constructed in 1944 and used by the US Army Air Force as a bomber base.

Mr Burnett  – who has published his book on Chilton, the first 3,000 years – illustrated his talk with many slides and gave much more interesting information than can be included in a brief report. He was warmly thanked by Secretary Clare Mathieson supported by an appreciative audience of about 30.

Next meeting: Tuesday 11th June – a visit to Bulmer Brickyard when Peter Minter will talk about recent restoration projects.  Please meet at the Brickyard at 7pm 

 

Ken Nice

Foxearth and District Local History Society – 9th April 2019

The Foxearth and District Local History Society meeting on 9th April attracted railway enthusiasts  when Robyn Lloyd Hughes talked about the rise and decline of the Stour Valley Railways. Between 35 and 40 members and guests heard an expert description of the origin of the line and of the development of railways in general.

The lecture included many photographs and Robyn began  with one of some Roman gates. These were constructed to allow the passage of two centurions, side by side, with their baggage/weapons. Carts were then built of the same width and as these were used in the countryside uniform ruts would be created which in turn became supported by wooden planks (plateways); then iron was used for more strengthening. Along these reinforced routes horses could pull linked carts – and the idea of moving wagons along tracks was born. It took some 1,800 years of course but eventually we had railways! Stephenson’s “rocket” of 1825 was the first engine.

The concept of a local rail network was the brainchild of John Wilks junior – a Sudbury lawyer born in 1793 who served as a Whig MP for the town.In 1824 he promoted a company called The Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex Railroad Company. He was however an unscrupulous character – involved in forgery and fraud – who earned the nickname of “Bubbles Wilks” because of the number of joint stock companies he floated all of which failed. In 1849 the businessman John Chevallier Cobbold was influential in constructing the line that linked up Colchester,  the Stour Valley, Sudbury and Halstead; Norwich was later connected and the company amalgamated with the Eastern Union Railway. The project included the building of the Chappel Viaduct with its impressive 32 arches. At 1,020 feet it is the longest bridge in East Anglia and one of the largest brick-built structures in the country. There were many illustrations of locomotives in various stages of development and it was not unusual for them to be servicable for 50 years. For some years the railway did not dispense with “horse power” as the beasts continued to be used for shunting rolling stock into sheds. The Stour Valley Railway line from Shelford to Marks Tey opened in 1865 with connections to Melford and Bury St Edmunds following soon after. In 1967 the Beeching axe was wielded with just the Sudbury to Marks Tey section (the Gainsborough line) surviving after a protracted battle. Robyn presented some interesting fare comparisons. In 1849 the Sudbury to London single fare was 4 shillings and 10 pence equating to one penny a mile – this was for 2nd class travel with 1st class being half as much again; in 1956 the figure was 9 shillings and 3 pence and today it is £33.90! In 2004 the possibility of reopening the Cambridge to Haverhill route was raised and this is an ongoing campaign with local MPs voicing strong support more recently.

This was a fascinating talk in which Robyn demonstrated his detailed knowledge of the subject including the evolving types of locomotives over the years. He dealt expertly with some related questions and was warmly thanked on behalf of a most appreciative audience by Secretary Clare Mathieson

Clare drew attention to the Lavenham Festival on the weekend of 17th to 19th May. There will be celebration of the 75th anniversary of the arrival of the US Army Air Force at Lavenham  airfield ,  a craft fair and various other attractions.

Next meeting: Tuesday 14th May at 7.30pm in Foxearth Village Hall  when David Burnett will talk about Chilton – the first three thousand years.

Ken Nice.